Psychedelic Porn Crumpets secret show @ Jimmys Den

An unusually cold Autumn night didn’t stop music lovers from traipsing down to Rhubarb Records in East Vic Park for an exclusive listening party. The tiny, square room was overflowing with those eager to hear Psychedelic Porn Crumpets’ debut album, High Visceral {Part 1}, played on vinyl for the first time. Although the album was released two months ago, a silence fell across the room as opening track “Cornflake” rang out through the record store. As an avid record collector I’ll admit, there is something magical about hearing an album in its entirety on vinyl, the gentle pops and clicks adding a personal touch.

Passers-by looked through the shop windows curiously, as guests munched on free cheese, and what seemed like an endless supply of free beer – something the younger patrons were abusing. This was also Rhubarb Records first day open in their new – and apparently bigger – store, offering patrons the chance to flick through records in rustic, wooden crates. The relaxing and chilled vibe was harshly broken as the shop’s security alarm started blaring away. “Wow, I love this song!” yelled one longhaired boy, with his fingers firmly pressed in his ears.

As High Visceral {Part 1} came to an end and the free beer slowly ran out, most of the attendees scuttled over to Jimmy’s Den for a secret Psychedelic Porn Crumpets gig. There had been next to no advertising – which would have ruined the secret part.

The Kramers energetically launched into opening track, “Love Concoction”. A couple of missed notes showed the garage rockers are still young, but it didn’t take long for them to shake off their nerves. With crashing cymbals, gritty guitars and ear splitting vocals, the three-piece assaulted the small crowd with their aggressive sound. During their last track, “I Think I saw the Devil”, a man from the crowd joined The Kramers on stage with a tambourine. Whether he was part of the band or just happened to have a tambourine on him is still a mystery.

Black Stone from the Sun proved you don’t need to be a large band to create an incredible amount of noise, with just Sean Mackay on guitar and vocals and Jack Nelson on drums. Despite the lack of a bass player, each song had a chunky and thick sound that reverberated deep in your chest. It was near impossible to hear Mackay through their first few songs, which can only be blamed on the sound guy. The duo treated the crowd to several unreleased and untitled songs, at times shifting away from their signature breakneck beats and screeching vocals. However, these new tracks may need more practice, as Mackay admitted to playing the wrong chords during “Old As Culture”. But that’s the beauty of grunge music; mistakes are barely noticeable.

Psychedelic Porn Crumpets soon took to the stage blending their sound check seamlessly into a beautiful instrumental piece, before aggressively launching into “Ergophobia”, a heavy number that saw the crowd jump to the beat, shaking the floor. With otherworldly guitar sounds and crazy, varied tempos, the boys kept the crowd constantly on their toes. They also suffered technical difficulties, as front man Jack McEwan’s pedal gave up half way through “Surf’s Up”, which saw him desperately trying to fix it during “Cornflake”. This led to some incredible improvisation, a skill not many bands seem to possess.

McEwan may have enjoyed the free beer at Rhubarb Record’s a little too much, as he requested an “African beat” from drummer Danny Caddy, before telling a bizarre story about Namibia and an elephant. The band looked as confused as the crowd, with guitarist Luke Parish exclaiming he “had no idea what that nonsense was about”. Their latest single “Cubensis Lenses” provoked the mosh monster inside everyone, with an unprecedented amount of crowd surfers flying through the air. Hungry for more, the crowd demanded an encore – something the four-piece clearly hadn’t planned for. Deciding to play a song they’ve been working on, McEwan invited someone on stage to help sing along. What could have been a disaster worked surprisingly well; McEwan visibly shocked at how perfectly the guest’s lyrics fitted with the track. Perhaps he’ll be a featured artist when the untitled song is finally released.

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